A Day in the Life of a TELLAL Student

Ever wondered how you might juggle a TELLAL course with your everyday life?  How much time does it take up and what might be the scheduling challenges?

Since registrations are now open for a new set of TELLAL courses, we wanted to help prospective students learn more about what would be involved and how you might be able to picture yourself managing your studies.  A TELLAL course has the potential to kick-start your teaching career, with an essential qualification, or grow your career with vital skills development, all through our exclusive blended learning techniques.  So if you are thinking about a change this year, here is a little insight into what to expect. 

Maria Asif currently works as a Teacher’s Assistant and is on track to obtain her iPgCTP through TELLAL.  We spoke to her about her course and what a typical day looks like for her.

Hi Maria, thank you so much for chatting to us! What made you decide to do a TELLAL course?

When I started as a parent helper at a GEMS school, I quickly realized how much I loved working with children and so I applied to be a teaching assistant.  The more and more I worked in that role, the more I knew teaching was the right course for me.  That is why I wanted to do the TELLAL course so that I could become properly qualified as a teacher.  Plus everyone recommended TELLAL as the best course, especially since the qualification would be recognized both locally and internationally.

How much time per week do you spend on TELLAL course work?

I actually do some TELLAL work every day – although that might just be me!  I usually do around 1 hour of research and weekly assignment work every evening and then I attend sessions at GEMS Al Barsha National School for Boys one afternoon a week. 

As a mother, a teaching assistant and a TELLAL student – how do you juggle your time?  What does an average day look like for you?

I do like to try and keep a routine (as much as possible) so that I can make sure to fit everything in, so most days are pretty similar. I wake up early around 5am and do the morning chores of waking up the kids and getting them ready, preparing breakfast and packing lunch boxes.  Once they are ready we all drive to school and it is off to class for all of us.  I help the teacher in preparing books and daily lessons, working with the children and engaging them when the teacher isn’t around.  I take them out in their playtime, to the clinic if they are sick and I watch them whilst they are eating lunch and snacks.  After school I like to prepare dinner whilst chatting with my children about their day and making sure they do their homework.  We usually have dinner around 7.30pm and then I like to encourage the children to read a book before bed (which luckily they still love doing). At around 8.30 or 9pm I will sit down to do research or browsing for my TELLAL assignments, if it is an easy day I’ll head to bed around 10.30pm or sometimes after 11pm if I am really trying to grasp an important point.

What is the best part about your TELLAL course?

I am still at the beginning of the course, but I absolutely love listening to the teachers at TELLAL.  They are so experienced and inspiring. 

What do you feel you are learning most about right now?

I actually think I am really exploring my interest in teaching and why I am motivated to be a teacher.  It has reinforced my passion and the potential teachers have to make a difference in the lives of their students.  I am also getting a good awareness of the importance of new technologies and methods  in teaching to make it more student focused. 

What are the biggest challenges so far on your TELLAL course?

Probably having to leave my children at home.  It is sometimes hard to feel like I might be missing out on time with them, but I understand it will all be worth it in the end and how proud they will be of their Mummy when she becomes a fully qualified teacher.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to do a TELLAL course?

I’ve actually suggested it to several of my friends already – they are signing up for the next course.  A key thing is to complete your IELETS before applying, it is much easier to get that before-hand.  Otherwise just make sure you are ready to multi-task and passionate about teaching!

Sheryl Lee Rogers
Senior Manager – Digital Professional Learning & Development
A Day in the Life of a TELLAL Student
Sheryl is responsible for the design, development and deployment of digital resources and environments that are at the heart of TELLAL’s methodologies.
A Day in the Life of a TELLAL Student
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